Author and Gun Advocate Emily Miller to Speak at State GOP Meeting

September 20, 2013
By
Miller will attend the Friday night reception in Denver and sign copies of her book

Miller will attend the Friday night reception in Denver and sign copies of her book

WASHINGTON — Emily Miller, author of the newly released book Emily Gets Her Gun … But Obama Wants to Take Yours, will be the featured guest at the GOP’s state central committee meeting this weekend to speak on the topic that has made her a cult hero among gun rights advocates.

Miller will attend the Friday night reception at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Denver and sign copies of her book, and will also speak to attendees at a 9 a.m. event on Saturday.

As a senior editor at The Washington Times, Miller closely watched the recall election held earlier this month, writing that it marked a turning point in a string of successes by gun-control advocates since the Newtown, Conn., tragedy.

“The outcome of the races could determine how much further Second Amendment rights are abridged across the nation,” Miller said.

In an interview with The Colorado Observer earlier this week, Miller said she was excited to attend the Republican Party events to offer her congratulations in person.

“It’s such a privilege to talk to the people who led such an amazing effort – the first statewide recall in Colorado’s history – and it wins in Democratic districts, it’s just remarkable,” Miller said.

Colorado’s Democratic Senate President John Morse and Sen. Angela Giron were voted out of office for their efforts to pass the new state requiring burdensome background checks and ammunition limits in magazines.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg played a key role in the race, contributing $350,000 to defeat the pro-gun movement.

“What is so remarkable about what happened out there, is all the money coming from Bloomberg and labor unions, all of the Democratic Party forces and the White House,” Miller said.

“But Coloradans just let their voices be heard, it was an organic movement,” Miller said. “They changed the dynamic of the American populace, they said ‘no’ to Bloomberg, you can’t buy our votes, and ‘no’ to gun control.”

“It was so powerful because it shows that democracy is alive and well and that people don’t want more gun control, especially the people of Colorado,” Miller said.

Published by Regnery and released earlier this month, Miller’s book traces the author’s attempts to purchase a gun Washington, D.C. after the Supreme Court struck down the crime-ridden city’s ban on handguns.

The four-month process to cut through the bureaucratic red tape of the city’s police department cost her nearly $500 in fees.

The book details President Barack Obama’s gun control agenda, how the administration and Democrats manipulate tragedies involving guns to advance their scheme, and in many cases succeed in their plans.

The book examines the Bloomberg connection and his Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, and the gun control battle in Colorado’s legislature.

After the tragic shooting in Aurora, Miller writes that Gov. John Hickenlooper caved to pressure from Obama and Bloomberg to push gun control measures through the state legislature for universal background checks and the ban on magazines holding more than 15 rounds.

“What I think is just amusing about the whole situation, is how the national liberal media was talking about how these two (recall) elections were a referendum of President Obama’s gun control agenda, and a referendum on Bloomberg’s effect on gun control,” Miller said.

“And then when the pro gun people won both recalls, suddenly you’ve not heard a single story about that referendum anymore. Suddenly, the national media is just talking about these as two local elections, because it no longer fit their agenda,” Miller said.

Colorado’s gun control law remains in place. However, a lawsuit against Hickenlooper that has support from 55 county sheriffs is seeking to overturn the measure.

“I think it’s a very strong lawsuit, considering all the sheriffs behind it. But it takes a long time to get gun control laws, or any law overturned in court,” Miller said.

“While I applaud Colorado for what they’ve done, I do still look at this as a warning sign to other people in America — this is what happens if you let your state legislatures get away with this kind of stuff, because you’re going to spend years under these laws, before you can get rid of them,” Miller said.

“The unfortunate thing about this, is they can’t do anything about the law right now,” Miller said.

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