Udall backs Obama’s Plan to Bypass Congress to Aid Illegal Immigrants

July 2, 2014
By

Sen. Mark Udall

Sen. Mark Udall

WASHINGTON – The president’s decision to bypass Congress and enact sweeping changes to the nation’s immigration system is supported by Colorado Sen. Mark Udall who says Barack Obama was forced to act alone.

The Republican-controlled House has refused to vote on the Senate’s immigration bill that included amnesty for more than 12 million illegal immigrants. Instead, House lawmakers are holding out for increase border protections against illegal crossings, strengthened interior enforcement, and reforming the bureaucratic immigration process.

“The House of Representatives should not abdicate its responsibility to reform our immigration laws to the president,” Udall said in a statement.

Obama announced Monday he would redirect interior immigration resources to the southern border to help him identify what actions he can take unilaterally to bypass Congress, including new protections to block illegal immigrants from being deported and granting new work permits.

“I’m beginning a new effort to fix as much of our immigration system as I can on my own, without Congress,” Obama said Monday during a prepared speech.

Udall has urged the president since early June to take unilateral action if the House refused to pass the Senate’s amnesty bill.

“The White House should take immediate steps to curb the deportation of immigrants that is breaking up families whose only crime is seeking a better life for themselves,” said a statement issued by Udall’s office.

Republican Rep. Cory Gardner who is challenging Udall for the Senate seat says he has spent more than a year calling for meaningful reform of the government’s broken immigration system, but cautioned Obama against acting unilaterally.

“When the president acts outside the legal boundaries of his office, he undermines trust with the very members of Congress who can deliver on that promise,” Gardner said.

Colorado Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet, a member of the so-called “Group of 8” who wrote the immigration bill passed in April 2013, criticized House Speaker John Boehner for playing politics by refusing to bring their measure up for a vote. Bennet did not comment on Obama’s plan to act by administrative fiat.

Republicans criticized the president’s proposed actions and already blame the surge of Central American children abandoned at the border by their parents on the administration’s drive to grant amnesty.

Colorado Republican Rep. Doug Lamborn called Obama’s actions “yet another showcase of an out-of-control presidency.”

“We have a president who we cannot trust to enforce the immigration laws already on the books. That is why the House will not pass the Senate immigration amnesty bill,” Lamborn said.

“President Obama has created the humanitarian problems on our southern border by proposing executive orders to loosen up our immigration laws. To believe that he will address these problems with more executive orders is insulting and should deeply concern the American people,” Lamborn said.

Comments made by visitors are not representative of The Colorado Observer staff.

7 Responses to Udall backs Obama’s Plan to Bypass Congress to Aid Illegal Immigrants

  1. Brian McFarlane
    July 2, 2014 at 2:10 pm

    “… whose only crime is seeking a better life for themselves,” said a statement issued by Udall’s office.

    No, crossing the border illegally is a misdemeanor, seeking a better life by itself is not a crime. Coming here without “permission”, crossing the border is analogist to forgery, theft/shoplifting, simple assault, menacing, perjury or trespass. According to ICE most of “unauthorized immigrants” that are caught have re-entered the US after being deported, that is a criminal felony offense that has possible jail time of 2-20 years if prosecuted… rarely is.

    Our leaders don’t enforce the immigration laws we already have but somehow we are going to believe that if this bill is passed it’s laws WILL be enforced? If “reform” means enforcing immigration laws already on the books, I’ll bet that the majority of Americans support that but we don’t need a bill to enforce the laws we currently have.

    I will ask again; what is broken?

    Since 2000 the US has allowed on average a little over 1 million legal immigrants in. The US allows about 400,000 more immigrants than any other country … currently Germany is second allowing about 600,000 annually. The US also allows about 800,000 guest workers annually. The “immigration reform” bill is calling for allowing at least 4 million immigrants/guest workers per year.

    What is broken is our will to enforce current laws.

    According to a Gallup poll done in June 2014 … Americans think immigration should be decreased rather than increased, by a nearly two-to-one margin, 41% vs. 22%.

  2. Val
    July 2, 2014 at 4:37 pm

    I’m continually amazed and dismayed at Sen. Udall’s lack of respect for America.

  3. Bob Simons
    July 2, 2014 at 5:56 pm

    This is exactly why Udall needs to be FIRED1

  4. Bob Simons
    July 2, 2014 at 6:04 pm

    Udall has abdicated his responsibility to us! FIRE HIM! Oh by the way, his “signature accomplishment” of 6 years in the US Senate is recocognition of Cinco De Mayo………..Was this worth $175,000 per year?
    FIRE UDALL IN 2014!

  5. Bob Simons
    July 2, 2014 at 7:24 pm

    Hey Udall, you are not going to rule me!!!! YOU ARE FIRED!

  6. Steve Canon
    July 2, 2014 at 11:01 pm

    Udall is a tool for his progressive masters. He cares nothing of Colorado and its people.

  7. Choom Dadey
    July 3, 2014 at 8:57 am

    This is great news. This will end is reign on the working class of Colorado. It’s bad news for the elites that are for low wage’s for all.

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